Strange Guns

By Annika R.

4 notes

Pretty self explanatory. The strange thing is I’m pretty sure I drew these up some time before NAA came out with the Ranger top-break…

Pretty self explanatory. The strange thing is I’m pretty sure I drew these up some time before NAA came out with the Ranger top-break…

3 notes

Here’s a funny one. A “constant recoil” AR type rifle (see Sullivan’s Ultimax 100 if you don’t know what I’m talking about). The whole receiver/body is one piece and polymer. The complete BCG, weights and action spring all pull straight out of the back. The trigger guard and standard AR grip are removed for access to the trigger control group.
Because this was designed to let the BCG and weights run out on its action spring instead of slamming into the rear of the receiver as in constant-recoil designs at first I wasn’t sure what to do with the regular AR top position charging handle, since it would be in the way of the gas key (I think I wanted to keep a lot of parts compatibility). As a result on this iteration of the design I rotated everything so the non-reciprocating charging handle is on the right side and and the bolt ejects upwards, with shells bouncing to the right after hitting a raised/angled dustcover. It has a carrying handle because you wouldn’t be able to put an optic on it with that upward ejection anyway. The barrel and handguard quick-detach as a complete unit for compact carry.
After drawing this I discovered that the constant-recoil system works best with fully automatic, open-bolt designs. That’s not really my thing, so I dropped it. Image copyright Annika R. 2012

Here’s a funny one. A “constant recoil” AR type rifle (see Sullivan’s Ultimax 100 if you don’t know what I’m talking about). The whole receiver/body is one piece and polymer. The complete BCG, weights and action spring all pull straight out of the back. The trigger guard and standard AR grip are removed for access to the trigger control group.

Because this was designed to let the BCG and weights run out on its action spring instead of slamming into the rear of the receiver as in constant-recoil designs at first I wasn’t sure what to do with the regular AR top position charging handle, since it would be in the way of the gas key (I think I wanted to keep a lot of parts compatibility). As a result on this iteration of the design I rotated everything so the non-reciprocating charging handle is on the right side and and the bolt ejects upwards, with shells bouncing to the right after hitting a raised/angled dustcover. It has a carrying handle because you wouldn’t be able to put an optic on it with that upward ejection anyway. The barrel and handguard quick-detach as a complete unit for compact carry.

After drawing this I discovered that the constant-recoil system works best with fully automatic, open-bolt designs. That’s not really my thing, so I dropped it. Image copyright Annika R. 2012

Filed under constant recoil ar15

5 notes

Some of my drawings

Following are some scans of old designs I’ve drawn. Some of these are aesthetic experiments, others are design ideas that I’ve abandoned. All of my own original images will be copyrighted Annika R. (year of production). I won’t be posting anything that seems patentable from my standpoint, if somebody decides that they do want to produce a working model of any of my (silly) concepts, I say go for it.

13 notes

Coonan .357 Mag. Automatic Compensated Pistol.
I think the Coonan qualifies as a strange gun for the choice of caliber - generally speaking it’s considered to be too much of a PITA to produce a detachable box magazine fed semi-automatic firearm that reliably loads and cycles large caliber rimmed rounds, the gas powered Desert Eagle standing as the usual exception. I personally prefer the aesthetics of the Coonan to the Eagle. The Coonan also uses a more conventional linkless Browning tipping barrel action.

Coonan .357 Mag. Automatic Compensated Pistol.

I think the Coonan qualifies as a strange gun for the choice of caliber - generally speaking it’s considered to be too much of a PITA to produce a detachable box magazine fed semi-automatic firearm that reliably loads and cycles large caliber rimmed rounds, the gas powered Desert Eagle standing as the usual exception. I personally prefer the aesthetics of the Coonan to the Eagle. The Coonan also uses a more conventional linkless Browning tipping barrel action.

Filed under semi automatic .357 magnum coonan

209 notes

Beautiful Charola-Anitua pistol, factory engraved. This specimen is one of the rarer 7mm variants, although even in this larger caliber the locking breech may strike modern observers as overkill.
"The mechanism of the Charola is similar in principle to the Mauser C96, with a moving wedge being used to lock the bolt to the barrel/slide (which is machined as a single unit, like the Mauser). Upon recoiling backwards about 5mm, the wedge disengages, the barrel stops, and the bolt continues recoiling backwards to eject the empty case."
Quote from http://www.forgottenweapons.com/early-automatic-pistols/charola-anitua/

Beautiful Charola-Anitua pistol, factory engraved. This specimen is one of the rarer 7mm variants, although even in this larger caliber the locking breech may strike modern observers as overkill.

"The mechanism of the Charola is similar in principle to the Mauser C96, with a moving wedge being used to lock the bolt to the barrel/slide (which is machined as a single unit, like the Mauser). Upon recoiling backwards about 5mm, the wedge disengages, the barrel stops, and the bolt continues recoiling backwards to eject the empty case."

Quote from http://www.forgottenweapons.com/early-automatic-pistols/charola-anitua/

Filed under pistol firearm Guns gun vintage engraved Spain Spanish

35 notes

Remington-Pedersen .45acp Model 53.
Here’s a neat one. Many firearms enthusiasts are aware of Pedersen’s Remington Model 51, widely considered to be one of the finer (if mechanically complicated) pocket pistols, being very accurate, pleasant to shoot and extremely ergonomic. It’s method of operation was not simple blow-back, but rather “hesitation” lock or action:
"During firing, the cartridge case is set back about .08" by chamber pressure. This starts the rearward movement of the breechbolt and slide. The breechbolt engages a shoulder on the frame after having traveled about 3/32". The slide continues rearward, lifts the breechbolt out of its temporary engagement, and continues to compress the action spring."
While it was later recognized that a locking action was unnecessary for the .380 and smaller pistol rounds, relatively few people know that a .45acp prototype was built for testing by the Navy as a potential replacement for the 1911. Reports indicate that with its fixed-barrel and low bore axis, the .45 Remington-Pedersen Model 53 outperformed the 1911 in just about all areas and was tentatively chosen, however a sudden entrance into WWI made it so that the already tooled-up 1911 continued being produced and the Model 53 fell by the wayside.
Considering the continued acceptance of the 1911, perhaps this model, if reintroduced, would prove to be as much of a success in the civilian market as it apparently was with the Navy.
See more at http://www.forgottenweapons.com/remington-m53/

Remington-Pedersen .45acp Model 53.

Here’s a neat one. Many firearms enthusiasts are aware of Pedersen’s Remington Model 51, widely considered to be one of the finer (if mechanically complicated) pocket pistols, being very accurate, pleasant to shoot and extremely ergonomic. It’s method of operation was not simple blow-back, but rather “hesitation” lock or action:

"During firing, the cartridge case is set back about .08" by chamber pressure. This starts the rearward movement of the breechbolt and slide. The breechbolt engages a shoulder on the frame after having traveled about 3/32". The slide continues rearward, lifts the breechbolt out of its temporary engagement, and continues to compress the action spring."

While it was later recognized that a locking action was unnecessary for the .380 and smaller pistol rounds, relatively few people know that a .45acp prototype was built for testing by the Navy as a potential replacement for the 1911. Reports indicate that with its fixed-barrel and low bore axis, the .45 Remington-Pedersen Model 53 outperformed the 1911 in just about all areas and was tentatively chosen, however a sudden entrance into WWI made it so that the already tooled-up 1911 continued being produced and the Model 53 fell by the wayside.

Considering the continued acceptance of the 1911, perhaps this model, if reintroduced, would prove to be as much of a success in the civilian market as it apparently was with the Navy.

See more at http://www.forgottenweapons.com/remington-m53/

Filed under Guns gun firearm pistol vintage .45

88 notes

peashooter85:

The Zulaica Automatic Revolver,
Invented in 1905 by the Spanish firm M. Zulaica y Cia, this interesting .22 revolver is one of those rare and mysterious automatic revolvers.  It is not double or single action, instead the force from each discharge works a mechanism which turns the cylinder and cocks the hammer.  These pistols were not very common but did make a popular pocket revolver for French officers during World War I.  Production ended in 1920.

peashooter85:

The Zulaica Automatic Revolver,

Invented in 1905 by the Spanish firm M. Zulaica y Cia, this interesting .22 revolver is one of those rare and mysterious automatic revolvers.  It is not double or single action, instead the force from each discharge works a mechanism which turns the cylinder and cocks the hammer.  These pistols were not very common but did make a popular pocket revolver for French officers during World War I.  Production ended in 1920.

(via peashooter85)

29 notes

As a last post for a little while here’s the Clair, with a rare photo generously found and supplied by ForgottenWeapons.com. Check them out if you haven’t already, they’re very knowledgeable folks and Ian in particular is quite the helpful sort if anyone has questions about some of the rarer firearms out there.
"The French Clair pistol of 1893 is one of the lesser known and least documented early automatic pistols, and unusual in its method of operation as well. The majority of the successful early automatics (the Borchardt/Luger and Mauser in particular) used short recoil mechanisms to unlock, but the Clair was a gas operated design."
(Click image for more info)

As a last post for a little while here’s the Clair, with a rare photo generously found and supplied by ForgottenWeapons.com. Check them out if you haven’t already, they’re very knowledgeable folks and Ian in particular is quite the helpful sort if anyone has questions about some of the rarer firearms out there.

"The French Clair pistol of 1893 is one of the lesser known and least documented early automatic pistols, and unusual in its method of operation as well. The majority of the successful early automatics (the Borchardt/Luger and Mauser in particular) used short recoil mechanisms to unlock, but the Clair was a gas operated design."

(Click image for more info)

Filed under Guns gun firearm pistol vintage Antique rare