Strange Guns

By Annika R.

8 notes

Very rare Model 1895 Krnka Prototype/Test pistol 8mm as developed by Karel Krnka.

There were only a handful of these early pistol produced at best with almost no examples surviving in the world today. Krnka was credited with several innovative patents during his life time. This pistol has a very unique mechanism that has a locked breech with “rotating/turn bolt” mechanism. It is also fitted with an early hold-open device based on the use of the magazine follower, with a side mounted bolt release, operating in the same manner as many of the current day semi-automatic rifle and pistols. It has an internal magazine like the M1907 Roth pistols and is loaded via a magazine stripper through the top of the action. It is cocked/loaded by pushing the barrel reward, inserting a loaded stripper, pushing the rounds into the internal magazine and withdrawing the stripper, allowing the bolt to go forward and ready to fire. One of the most interesting and unique features of this pistol is that it actually can fire in a double action manner and has a rebounding hammer. This rebounding mechanism works when you fire the pistol and the trigger is released the hammer automatically rebounds to the half-cock position.

Krnka later went on to design the pistol that would become the Roth-Steyr M1907.

Filed under firearm Guns gun pistol vintage Antique automatic pistol

51 notes

Schulhof repeating pistol with rotary magazine, M1887

This particular version, a later example, has a 5.25” bbl with drift adjustable front and rear sights.Loading is through a rotary magazine whose cover is secured by a banded spring that locks into left receiver. A finger loop under the receiver was used to close the bolt. Having travelled to its final position, pressure on the trigger releases the firing pin to fire the cartridge. On the left side of the frame, beside the finger loop, is a fire blued safety. Moving the safety up blocks the trigger. Downward movement frees the gun to fire. With only minor pressure, the finger loop disengages and moves forward, ready for the next loading.

Filed under firearm Guns gun pistol vintage Antique Repeater steampunk Steam Punk

175 notes

Here’s a very odd one. A prototype automatic (maybe .45 acp)  single action / double action pistol that looks quite a bit like a revolver (or sci-fi movie gun).

In other places on the internet this is listed as actually being a semi-auto revolver but I don’t think it is: I’m pretty sure the “cylinder” is actually just a rotary magazine (it doesn’t even line up exactly with the barrel), making this a more or less conventionally fed semi auto pistol, with respect to the magazine-chamber relationship. Of course that leaves the particulars of the action and a lot of other things up in the air, certainly something very interesting is going on here.

Apparently “THIS one is pictured in a 1930’s catalog WORLD’S GUNS, an advertisement catalog by Golden State, page 192.” and perhaps the catalog entry includes a bit more information.

Please contact me if you have any other information about this design!

Filed under prototype pistol revolver sci-fi Guns vintage gun Steam Punk steampunk

1 note

GOOD NEWS!!!

Guess what? I’m bringing back the blog on an occasional basis, but now it’s “Strange Guns” - all about weird, wacky designs and firearms of unique historical significance. I went back through and cleaned up/added to some old info and will be posting new material as I discover it!

Filed under guns weird strange unique

1 note

Remington Announces New R-51 Pistol

In a general sense this is what I’ve been wishing modern arms manufacturers would do for quite some time now. And I feel fairly vindicated with regards to my now not-so-silly desire to see Pedersen’s design updated for use with higher pressure rounds. Sweet!

As it stands I classify the Remington 51 (both Sr. and Jr.) as “strange guns” because of the rarity of the action - to my knowledge these are the only two firearms that utilize Pedersen’s “hesitation lock” system, similar to a kind of delayed blow-back. This may, of course, change in the future.

Filed under Remington model 51

39 notes

peashooter85:

The Brun Latrige Pistol,

Patented in 1868 but not manufactured until 1890, the Brun Latrige was a French pistol with a very odd design.  Firing was done by pulling back on the trigger/trigger guard.  Pulling back on the trigger would eject an empty casing, load a new casing, and fire the cartridge.  That is why as you can see the pistol has such a long trigger pull.  The gun was fed from an internal magazine which held 10 small 6mm rounds.  An odd looking pistol, they were underpowered and few were produced. 

(Source: littlegun.info, via peashooter85)

2 notes

George Wilson's Prototype .45 Autopistol

Well, those lucky folks over at ForgottenWeapons.com got to handle a George Wilson .45, one of my more recent items of interest on here. Ian did a much better job describing the workings of that particular piece so if you thought that gun was cool then head on over and check out their vid.

85 notes

 See this thread on AR15.com for more info. As it turns out, the basic concepts for the P90 magazine and feeding mechanism are anything but new (although it is unknown if FN was actually inspired by this design).
To anyone who had never seen a firearm using a transparent magazine of this type this probably would have looked like a pretty strange gun.

See this thread on AR15.com for more info. As it turns out, the basic concepts for the P90 magazine and feeding mechanism are anything but new (although it is unknown if FN was actually inspired by this design).

To anyone who had never seen a firearm using a transparent magazine of this type this probably would have looked like a pretty strange gun.