Strange Guns

By Annika R.

10 notes

pinkar15:

This machine kills fascists… and then doesn’t turn around, break up your agrarian land collective, throw you in a gulag and have you summarily executed.
I’ve met a lot of anarchists who have this weird thing for old Soviet guns, ostensibly because if they were produced in the correct time period then they were used to kill fascists of the old Nazi type.That’s all well and fine, but I guess I’m picky because I don’t think that detail makes it worth it for me to want an old Mosin Nagant. The Soviet regime sucked, period.
Enter the pistol “F Ascaso (Terrassa)” manufactured by CNT affiliated anarchists during the Spanish Civil War. It’s a copy of the also locally produced Astra 400, a simple and sturdy blow-back gun firing the 9mm Largo round (similar to 9mm Para but longer). On the top of the barrel is marked “F Ascaso”, for Francisco Ascaso Abadía, who was a famous anarchist during the period leading up to the civil war.
“In early 1934 he was appointed general secretary of the Regional Committee of the CNT of Catalonia. Defense Committee Member Confederal of Catalonia, at the outbreak of military insurrection in Barcelona July 19, 1936 took charge of CNT militants who took to the streets to fight the military and died on July 20 at the site the headquarters of the shipyards. His death made ​​him a hero and his hectic life very soon acquired mythical aura for international anarchist militancy.”
Nowadays the CNT is mostly associated with old-school, often boring syndicalism, meaning strikes and arbitration for concessions to workers. So it’s kind of interesting to remember that back in the day they were in it to win it, and they needed to build guns in order to have any chance of winning it. 
So if I’m going to be buying any firearms for their historical significance it’s probably going to be one of these, and not something manufactured by Stalinists. While they are hard to find in the states (only a handful were brought here in the 1930s by returning volunteers with the Abraham Lincoln Brigades), if you can find one you can still probably buy it for something in the $500 range, mostly because the general public is clueless about their history, and probably wouldn’t care that much anyway. Of course… I CALL DIBS!

pinkar15:

This machine kills fascists… and then doesn’t turn around, break up your agrarian land collective, throw you in a gulag and have you summarily executed.

I’ve met a lot of anarchists who have this weird thing for old Soviet guns, ostensibly because if they were produced in the correct time period then they were used to kill fascists of the old Nazi type.That’s all well and fine, but I guess I’m picky because I don’t think that detail makes it worth it for me to want an old Mosin Nagant. The Soviet regime sucked, period.


Enter the pistol “F Ascaso (Terrassa)” manufactured by CNT affiliated anarchists during the Spanish Civil War. It’s a copy of the also locally produced Astra 400, a simple and sturdy blow-back gun firing the 9mm Largo round (similar to 9mm Para but longer). On the top of the barrel is marked “F Ascaso”, for Francisco Ascaso Abadía, who was a famous anarchist during the period leading up to the civil war.

“In early 1934 he was appointed general secretary of the Regional Committee of the CNT of Catalonia. Defense Committee Member Confederal of Catalonia, at the outbreak of military insurrection in Barcelona July 19, 1936 took charge of CNT militants who took to the streets to fight the military and died on July 20 at the site the headquarters of the shipyards. His death made ​​him a hero and his hectic life very soon acquired mythical aura for international anarchist militancy.”


Nowadays the CNT is mostly associated with old-school, often boring syndicalism, meaning strikes and arbitration for concessions to workers. So it’s kind of interesting to remember that back in the day they were in it to win it, and they needed to build guns in order to have any chance of winning it.


So if I’m going to be buying any firearms for their historical significance it’s probably going to be one of these, and not something manufactured by Stalinists. While they are hard to find in the states (only a handful were brought here in the 1930s by returning volunteers with the Abraham Lincoln Brigades), if you can find one you can still probably buy it for something in the $500 range, mostly because the general public is clueless about their history, and probably wouldn’t care that much anyway. Of course… I CALL DIBS!

Now that's a coop that I'd love to work at

(via pinkar15-deactivated20130903)

47 notes

A crossbow pistol. Meaning not just a crossbow without a shoulder stock, but rather a non-combustion pistol with a hollow barrel designed to shoot heavy shot projectiles using a crossbow type action. “Probably German. Approximately .41 caliber. Barrel is a swamped brass hexagon type and is 5 1/2” long.”

A crossbow pistol. Meaning not just a crossbow without a shoulder stock, but rather a non-combustion pistol with a hollow barrel designed to shoot heavy shot projectiles using a crossbow type action. “Probably German. Approximately .41 caliber. Barrel is a swamped brass hexagon type and is 5 1/2” long.”

16 notes

Vektor H5 Pump Action Rifle. A South African manufactured variant of the Galil with the gas operated piston replaced with a manual pump. If threaded, this would be a mechanically ideal rifle to suppress, since you wouldn’t have the same excessive receiver fouling issues common to even piston operated suppressed semi-autos. Presumably, it could also be manufactured and sold for considerably less than many semi-automatic rifles.

Vektor H5 Pump Action Rifle. A South African manufactured variant of the Galil with the gas operated piston replaced with a manual pump. If threaded, this would be a mechanically ideal rifle to suppress, since you wouldn’t have the same excessive receiver fouling issues common to even piston operated suppressed semi-autos. Presumably, it could also be manufactured and sold for considerably less than many semi-automatic rifles.

Filed under ultimate suppressed rifle? pump assault rifle

9 notes

North & Couch Handheld/Animal Trap Pepperbox Pistol. Manufactured in the 1860s, the North & Couch pistol could be used as a handheld weapon with the conventional trigger or as a trap gun by securing a line to the action rod extending from the front of the barrel group. A single nipple fires all barrels.

North & Couch Handheld/Animal Trap Pepperbox Pistol. Manufactured in the 1860s, the North & Couch pistol could be used as a handheld weapon with the conventional trigger or as a trap gun by securing a line to the action rod extending from the front of the barrel group. A single nipple fires all barrels.

17 notes

Percussion pizza cutter………………………………………….. jk
This is actually a black-powder potency tester. A predetermined amount of the black-powder is placed in the chamber. The force of the explosion  caused by the powder turns a ratcheting meter against spring tension. That way you can calculate how much of powder to use in order to achieve a particular regualr load or skip dud powder altogether.

Percussion pizza cutter………………………………………….. jk

This is actually a black-powder potency tester. A predetermined amount of the black-powder is placed in the chamber. The force of the explosion  caused by the powder turns a ratcheting meter against spring tension. That way you can calculate how much of powder to use in order to achieve a particular regualr load or skip dud powder altogether.

14 notes

Patent number 12649, Rollin White’s “Improved Repeating Fire-Arm” of 1855. An interesting concept: a revolver who’s cylinder is fed extra (percussion) cartridges from a fixed side-mounted magazine when the hammer is cocked. Sadly, the scan doesn’t do justice to the photograph of the assembled prototype. This firearm supposedly resides within the Smithsonian’s collection. White also patented the first bored-through revolver cylinder for use with breech-loaded cartridges.

Patent number 12649, Rollin White’s “Improved Repeating Fire-Arm” of 1855. An interesting concept: a revolver who’s cylinder is fed extra (percussion) cartridges from a fixed side-mounted magazine when the hammer is cocked. Sadly, the scan doesn’t do justice to the photograph of the assembled prototype. This firearm supposedly resides within the Smithsonian’s collection. White also patented the first bored-through revolver cylinder for use with breech-loaded cartridges.

Filed under firearm prototype Antique vintage pistol Revolver gun

38 notes

The Carl J. Ehbets pistol, a Strange Guns exclusive!

Ehbets was the German-born chief designer for the Colt Patent Firearm Company through portions of the 1880s and 90s. Along with William Mason, he helped to develop the Colt M1889 revolver with swing-out cylinder, as well as others. Much less well known, he also designed several automatic pistols, with at least two examples of these having actually been assembled.

Ehbets’ grip-magazine design was generally referred to simply as the “Ehbets Pistol”, a complicated and in many ways bizarre design. The operation is difficult to categorize but essentially uses a modified M1895 Colt-Browning “potato digger” gas-lever action, although in this type the swinging gas lever thrusts the barrel forward as in a blow-forward design (some have suggested calling the gas-lever a “toggle” due to some of the mechanical forces involved with its operation - I’m not so sure about this). The 1897 patent sites having a fixed, integral breech block as a safety feature, in that there is no separate slide-breech which might break off of the firearm, flying backwards to injure the shooter (a potential detail of concern to individuals who had only ever shot revolvers before). Several small moving parts, all actuated by the forward motion of the barrel, serve to hold cartridges down away from the barrel until it is completely forward, and then to further hold the already magazine spring-advanced cartridge sufficiently up for chambering. These along with active extraction and ejection were meant to ensure what was described as absolutely certain and secure operation  without malfunction. Very little of this firearm conforms to our standard ideas of how a pistol should be put together, right down to the trigger.

This design bears a strong resemblance to Browning’s “magazine pistol” prototype, and indeed Browning had shown his prototype to the Colt Patent engineers at around the same time that Ehbets’ design was finalized. However, Browning’s various automatic designs were favored by the Colt company. Ehbets conceded the apparent superiority of Browning’s designs, and the two ended up working closely together.


From US patent no. 580935.

Filed under firearm pistol gun guns handgun colt Colt prototype

38 notes

Funny little idea. Pistol caliber AR carbine that loads standard Glock/Beretta etc. mags in the grip. Barrel placement causes it to look like an SBR even with a 16” barrel. Image copyright Annika R. 2011
[EDIT: A lot of people have commented that I should remove the standard magazine well. I don’t really understand this because 1) it can be used as a grip 2) I designed it to be a storage compartment, which is cool, and 3) it would look ugly without it]

Funny little idea. Pistol caliber AR carbine that loads standard Glock/Beretta etc. mags in the grip. Barrel placement causes it to look like an SBR even with a 16” barrel. Image copyright Annika R. 2011

[EDIT: A lot of people have commented that I should remove the standard magazine well. I don’t really understand this because 1) it can be used as a grip 2) I designed it to be a storage compartment, which is cool, and 3) it would look ugly without it]