Strange Guns

By Annika R.

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GOOD NEWS!!!

Guess what? I’m bringing back the blog on an occasional basis, but now it’s “Strange Guns” - all about weird, wacky designs and firearms of unique historical significance. I went back through and cleaned up/added to some old info and will be posting new material as I discover it!

Filed under guns weird strange unique

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Remington Announces New R-51 Pistol

In a general sense this is what I’ve been wishing modern arms manufacturers would do for quite some time now. And I feel fairly vindicated with regards to my now not-so-silly desire to see Pedersen’s design updated for use with higher pressure rounds. Sweet!

As it stands I classify the Remington 51 (both Sr. and Jr.) as “strange guns” because of the rarity of the action - to my knowledge these are the only two firearms that utilize Pedersen’s “hesitation lock” system, similar to a kind of delayed blow-back. This may, of course, change in the future.

Filed under Remington model 51

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peashooter85:

The Brun Latrige Pistol,

Patented in 1868 but not manufactured until 1890, the Brun Latrige was a French pistol with a very odd design.  Firing was done by pulling back on the trigger/trigger guard.  Pulling back on the trigger would eject an empty casing, load a new casing, and fire the cartridge.  That is why as you can see the pistol has such a long trigger pull.  The gun was fed from an internal magazine which held 10 small 6mm rounds.  An odd looking pistol, they were underpowered and few were produced. 

(Source: littlegun.info, via peashooter85)

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George Wilson's Prototype .45 Autopistol

Well, those lucky folks over at ForgottenWeapons.com got to handle a George Wilson .45, one of my more recent items of interest on here. Ian did a much better job describing the workings of that particular piece so if you thought that gun was cool then head on over and check out their vid.

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 See this thread on AR15.com for more info. As it turns out, the basic concepts for the P90 magazine and feeding mechanism are anything but new (although it is unknown if FN was actually inspired by this design).
To anyone who had never seen a firearm using a transparent magazine of this type this probably would have looked like a pretty strange gun.

See this thread on AR15.com for more info. As it turns out, the basic concepts for the P90 magazine and feeding mechanism are anything but new (although it is unknown if FN was actually inspired by this design).

To anyone who had never seen a firearm using a transparent magazine of this type this probably would have looked like a pretty strange gun.

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Here’s a seriously cool, rare firearm. Cal. 45 ACP Pistol hand built by George A. Wilson of Pennsylvania back in the 1960’s. Mr. Wilson, a designer for High Standard, designed & patented this pistol and was granted a patent in 1961. He had built SN 1 back in 1959 and used it to win an NRA tournament. Only 3 were built in total.

The first thing one notices about the firearm is the compact, in-line configuration. The action can be described as [edit] “a pivoting wedge to lock, somewhat like a Walther P38”. The layout of this pistol is very unusual (to say the least) and has a number of unique features. The slide mostly sits well towards the front and was designed with a super short breech face that allows for the action to recoil directly back in-line with the shooter’s hand. This design requires the entire fire control group and hammer to sit nestled in-between the front of the magazine and the breech. When the hammer is down an inclined section of it serves as the feed ramp (!) This and many other features make it difficult to describe the construction because it deviates so thoroughly from what most of us are used to.  The patent is well worth checking out: NO. 2, 975, 680

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Prototype or inventors model .30 caliber carbine pistol marked “Designed – Made by George F. Grebey, Sept. 1 1943” on butt and right side of frame marked “30 cal. short-semi-auto, -gas action-“. Grebey worked for Winchester and was involved in the engineering and manufacture of the M1 Carbine. This pistol version was made during the Second World War and Grebey hoped to secure a government contract for paratrooper or Special Forces use. The prototype measures 14” overall with 6” barrel, is finished in the bright and shows a left hand carbine style cocking lever with a feeding port that accepts M1 carbine magazines.

Prototype or inventors model .30 caliber carbine pistol marked “Designed – Made by George F. Grebey, Sept. 1 1943” on butt and right side of frame marked “30 cal. short-semi-auto, -gas action-“. Grebey worked for Winchester and was involved in the engineering and manufacture of the M1 Carbine. This pistol version was made during the Second World War and Grebey hoped to secure a government contract for paratrooper or Special Forces use. The prototype measures 14” overall with 6” barrel, is finished in the bright and shows a left hand carbine style cocking lever with a feeding port that accepts M1 carbine magazines.

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Tested in part in response to a request made by general Macarthur but found to be undesirable: effective silencing would require a reduction in bullet velocity and the mechanism would add considerable weight to the firearm.

Tested in part in response to a request made by general Macarthur but found to be undesirable: effective silencing would require a reduction in bullet velocity and the mechanism would add considerable weight to the firearm.